This Is How They Clean Those Gigantic Solar Energy Plants

The world’s largest solar plants sure look amazing , but for those with inquisitive minds they raise one big question: how the hell do they keep all those panels clean? Nowadays, using robots like this!

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UK Facebook and Twitter users warned over sharing court case information

In an effort to ensure UK courts can conduct fair trials, the UK Attorney General’s Office (AGO) will soon start advising Facebook and Twitter users about the dangers of commenting on legal cases. In a world of super-injunctions and tweeted court cases, users have often shared sensitive legal information, believing they are entitled to free speech online. However, Facebook and Twitter posts are subject to the same laws that apply to newspapers and TV media, meaning a status update or a tweet about a case or defendant could go viral, potentially influencing a jury or revealing the names of victims. By publishing guidance, the UK Attorney General will “help stop people from inadvertently breaking the law,” reducing the chances of prosecution for contempt and possible imprisonment. Advisories will be delivered via the @AGO_UK Twitter feed and website, giving those who commit contempt of court less wriggle room if they choose to plead ignorance.

[Image Credit: nomsaleena, Flickr]

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Black Friday & Holiday gift guide: How to pick the perfect iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Mac!

Apple Black Friday & Holiday gift guide: How to pick the perfect iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Mac!

How to pick the perfect Apple gift for the iPhone, iPad, iPod, and Mac lovers in your life!

We’re entering what is, for many, the biggest shopping and gift-giving season of the year, and by virtue of their quality, cachet, and overall coolness, Apple gifts are always high on everyone’s lists. Whether you’re looking for that perfect present for that special someone, or just want to take advantage of the once-a-year sales for yourself, it can be a challenge to figure out exactly which Apple devices to get. When does a Retina iPad mini make more sense than a full-sized iPad Air? When does a MacBook Air? iPhone 5s or iPhone 5c? MacBook Pro or iMac? What about an iPod? Figuring out which iPod, iPhone, iPad, or Mac is your best buy this year is the questions we get asked the most often, and with Black Friday and the Holidays upon us, here are our answers!

Apple holiday gift guide podcast

Rather watch or listen than read? No problem! Rene, Richard, and Chris sort through Apple’s 2013 product line up and pick the best Apple iPod, iPad, iPhone, and Mac gifts and for who!

Apple TV

Apple TV receives minor software update

If you’d love to have everything on your iPod, iPad, iPhone, or Mac on your big screen HDTV, you’d love an Apple TV

Pros: Incredibly easy to setup. Incredibly inexpensive. Includes on-board channels for iTunes TV, Movies, Music, Netflix, and many more, as well as the ability to AirPlay content from iOS or OS X devices.

Cons: Streaming-only. Only works with on-board channels and AirPlay. Hasn’t been updated since Spring 2012.

Bottom line: If all you want is the ability to stream content from Apple and their partners, and put what’s on your Apple devices onto your big screen TV, all you need is an Apple TV

iPod shuffle

If you need an ultra-light, ultra-cheap way to take just your audio with you, you want the iPod shuffle

If you need an ultra-light, ultra-cheap way to take just your audio with you, you want the iPod shuffle

Pros: 2GB of storages (enough for hundreds of songs), 15 hours of battery life. Convenient clip, available in blue, green, yellow, pink, purple, space gray, silver, and red (Apple Store exclusive). Weighs on 12.5 grams, costs only $49.

Cons: Requires a tethered connection to a Windows or Mac PC running iTunes to transfer audio files and playlists. No screen, no videos, no apps.

Bottom line: Whether you’re exercising or traveling, if you want just enough music, podcasts, and audiobooks to get you through your workout or work day, and not care if you lose it, get the iPod shuffle.

iPod classic

If you need 160GB of music and video in your pocket, you want the iPod classic

If you need 160GB of music and video in your pocket, you want the iPod classic

Pros: Can hold 40,000 songs or 200 hours of video. 36 hours of battery life. Can store photos, play extremely limited games.

Cons: Requires a tethered connection to a Windows or Mac PC running iTunes to transfer audio files and playlists. Small screen, no App Store.

Bottom line: If you’re a serious audiophile with serious audio collection, and want all of it in your pocket, get the iPod classic.

iPod nano

If you need your music and media on the go but don't need apps, you want the iPod nano

If you need your music and media on the go but don’t need apps, you want the iPod nano

Pros: 2.5-inch multitouch display. 16GB of storage. Includes apps for music, podcasts, video, exercise (pedometer, Nike+). Includes Bluetooth and FM radios. Available in blue, green, yellow, pink, purple, space gray, silver (white), and red (Apple Store exclusive). Weighs only 31 grams. Costs only $149.

Cons: Requires a tethered connection to a Windows or Mac PC running iTunes to transfer audio files and playlists. No Wi-Fi, no iCloud. Built-in apps only, no iOS, App Store. No 32GB option.

Bottom line: If an iPod touch is just too much, and all you want is a good amount of audio and video to keep you company at the gym, on a run, or on a trip, in the absolute smallest, lightest package available, get the iPod nano.

iPod touch

iPod touch

If you need incredibly mobile computing but don’t want another phone or phone bill, you want the iPod touch

Pros: 4-inch Retina display. Shoots 5mp photos and takes 1080p videos. 32GB and 64GB options. Available in space gray, silver, pink, blue, and red (Apple Store exclusive). Runs iOS, can play audio and video, read ebooks, and runs millions of App Store apps and games.

Cons: No cellular option (3G/LTE). Smaller screen than iPad line.

Bottom line: If an iPhone and all its apps would be perfect but you just don’t want or need a phone, get the even thinner, lighter iPod touch.

iPhone 5c

If you want a phone that's a little less expensive (and futuristic), but arguably even more fun, you want an iPhone 5c

If you want a phone that’s a little less expensive (and futuristic), but arguably even more fun, you want an iPhone 5c

Pros: 4-inch Retina display. Shoots 8mp photos and takes 1080p videos. 16GB, 32GB options. Available in white, pink, green, blue, and yellow. Runs iOS, can play audio and video, read ebooks, and runs over a million App Store apps and games. Subsidized prices start at $99 on contract.

Cons: Requires a carrier voice and data plan. No Touch ID or Apple A7/M7 chipset.

More info: iPhone 5c review, iPhone 5c buyers guide

  • $99 on contract and up – Buy now

iPhone 5s

iPhone 5s review

If you want the most futuristic, most feature-filled iPhone on the plant, you want the iPhone 5s

Pros: 4-inch Retina display. Shoots 8mp photos and takes 1080p videos. 16GB, 32GB and 64GB options. Available in space gray/black, silver/white, or gold/white. 64-bit Apple A7 chipset with Apple M7 coprocessor and Touch ID fingerprint sensor. Runs iOS, can play audio and video, read ebooks, and runs over one million App Store apps and games. Subsidized prices start at $199 on contract.

Cons: Requires a carrier voice and data plan.

Bottom line: If you need a phone, the iPhone can literally be your one iOS device to rule them all. If you need the ultimate in convergence, with mobile web, apps, and communications all in one place, get the iPhone.

More info: iPhone 5s review, iPhone 5s buyers guide

  • $199 on contract and up – Buy now

iPad mini with Retina display

If portability is more important to your than size, you want an iPad mini

Pros: 7.9-inch Retina display. Shoots 5mp photos and takes 1080p videos. 16GB, 32GB, 64GB, 128GB options. Available in space gray/black or silver/white. Plays audio and video, reads ebooks. Runs iOS, all App Store apps, including almost half-a-million tablet-specific iPad apps. Fits in purses, large jacket pockets. Cellular/LTE available. Weighs 331 grams.

Cons: Smaller screen, 100Mhz slower, narrower color gamut.

Bottom line: If you want a tablet but the full-sized iPad is just too big and too heavy, get the Retina iPad mini.

More info: iPad mini with Retina display review, iPad mini buyers guide

iPad Air

If you need to do computing but don’t want to lug around a laptop, you want an iPad

Pros: 9.7-inch screen. Shoots 5mp photos and takes 1080p videos. 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB options. Available with black or white front plates. Plays audio and video, reads ebooks. Runs iOS, all App Store apps, including hundreds of thousands of tablet-specific iPad apps. Weighs 652 grams. Cellular/LTE available.

Cons: Heavier than iPad mini, not as functional as a full MacBook for power users.

Bottom line: If you don’t need a laptop but still want a big screen and a powerful, convenient way to get a lot of things done, get an iPad Air.

More info: iPad Air review, iPad mini buyers guide

MacBook Air

If you need a full computer but portability is more important than power, get the MacBook Air

If you need a full computer but portability is more important than power, get the MacBook Air

Pros: 11 or 13-inch screen. Intel i5 or i7 processors. USB 3 and ThunderBolt ports. Up to Core i7. Up to 8GB or RAM. Up to 512GB of flash storage. Runs OS X and full desktop-class software. Weighs only 2.37 or 2.96lbs. 9 or 12 hours of battery life. Can be attached to 27-inch Thunderbolt display.

Cons: No Retina display, no optical drives, lack of high-powered graphics options hinders some types of software.

Bottom line: If you want something portable but still need to be able to run Office, Photoshop, Xcode, etc., get a MacBook Air. If you need maximum portability, get the 11-inch model. If you need maximum pixels, get the 13-inch model.

More info: Mac buyers guide

MacBook Pro

If you need a powerful computer that's still portable, you need the MacBook Pro

If you need a powerful computer that’s still portable, you need the MacBook Pro

Pros: 13- or 15-inch Retina displays. Dual-core i5 or quad-core i7 processors. USB 3 and ThunderBolt ports. Up to 16GB of RAM. Up to 1TB of flash storage. 9 to 8 hours of batter life. NVidia graphics option. Weighs only 3.46 or 4.46 lbs.

Cons: Less battery life. No optical drives.

Bottom line: If you want the state-of-the-art of laptops with the best displays in the business and power to match, get a MacBook Pro.

More info: Mac buyers guide

Mac mini

If you need a small Mac you can slide into any setup or workflow, you want the Mac mini

Pros: Dual-core i5 or quad-core i7 processors. USB 3, Ethernet, HDMI, FireWire 800, and ThunderBolt ports. 2GB, 8GB, or 16GB of RAM. Conventional hard drive, SSD, or Fusion Drive options. Starts at $599.

Cons: Requires separate display. No internal expansion ports. OVERDUE FOR UPDATE.

Bottom line: If you want a Mac for you server rack or home server closet, to add to an existing PC setup, or to use as a home theater, get a Mac mini.

More info: Mac buyers guide

  • Starting at $599 – Buy now (Warning: Overdue for update. Wait if you can!)

iMac

Everything you need to know about the all-new iMac: Apple's all-in-one, faster, more powerful, and thinner than ever

If you need full desktop power in an all-in-one package, you want the iMac

Pros: 21.5- and 27-inch displays. Quad-core i5 or quad-core i7 processors. 8GB or 16GB of RAM. Conventional hard drive, flash storage or Fusion Drive options. Multiple graphics options. Ethernet, UBS 3, and ThunderBolt ports. Incredibly thin design.

Cons: No internal expansion ports.

Bottom line: If you want an incredibly powerful Mac wrapped in an incredibly elegant design, get an iMac.

More info: Mac buyers guide

Mac Pro

EIf you need maximum power and speed, you need the Mac Pro

If you need maximum power and speed, you need the Mac Pro

Pros: State-of-the-art computing. Up to 8-core Xeon E5 processor. Up to 64GB RAM. Up to dual AMD FirePro D700 graphics cards. Up to 1TB of flash storage. Up to three 4K displays, six Thunderbolt displays. 4x USB3, 6x Thunderbolt, 2x Gigabit Ethernet, HDMI 1.4 UHD ports. 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.0.

Cons: No internal expansion ports. OpenCL/GPU focused.

Bottom line: If you need the Mac equivalent of Bugatti Veyron, you need a Mac Pro.

More info: Mac buyers guide

  • Ships later in December.

Need more help?

If you’re still not sure what you want, or which exact model you want, or all the options you want, we have complete buyers guides to help walk you through every decision along the way! We also have the iMore forums where you can ask questions, get answers, and talk about all your choices!

iPhone buyers guide

iPad buyers guide

Mac buyers guide

Your perfect Apple gift?

Are you buying anyone an iOS or Mac gift this year? Are you hoping to get one? Let me know what you’re giving or looking to receive! What’s your perfect Apple gift?

    

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/6ZoaJn__tMc/story01.htm
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Lady Gaga Shutting Down New York’s Roseland Ballroom

Legendary midtown venue Roseland Ballroom is officially closing its doors in early 2014 and Lady Gaga is slated to be the final performer.

Shutting down after a 100 year run, the Mother Monster plans to play four shows in the 3,500 capacity venue on March 28, 30, 31 and April 2.

Tickets go on sale on Monday (November 25th) and range from $50 dollars for general floor admission access to $200 dollars for mezzanine seating.

Roseland Ballroom, which was proclaimed to be “The World’s Greatest Ballroom,” opened in 1919 on 51st Street and Broadway. It later moved to its current location on West 52nd Street. In its iconic years of operation, it has hosted acts from Frank Sinatra and Fred Astaire to the Rolling Stones and Beyonce.

Stay linked with GossipCenter’s for more details on Lady Gaga’s performances at the Roseland Ballroom!

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/lady-gaga/lady-gaga-shutting-down-new-yorks-roseland-ballroom-964290
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Assad gaining ground in Syrian civil war

FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, damages are seen in the town of Hejeira, which Syrian troops captured, in the countryside of Damascus, Syria. Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, damages are seen in the town of Hejeira, which Syrian troops captured, in the countryside of Damascus, Syria. Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, people walk on a street between destroyed buildings in the town of Hejeira, which Syrian troops captured, in the countryside of Damascus, Syria. Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013 file photo, residents are directed by soldiers in the town of Hejeira, which Syrian troops captured, in the countryside of Damascus, Syria. Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion. (AP Photo, File)

FILE – In this Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 file photo, released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian army soldiers place a national flag in a square in the Sabina suburb which Syrian troops captured, south of Damascus, Syria. Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion. (AP Photo/SANA, File)

FILE – In this Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 file photo, released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian army soldiers take their positions on a street in Sabina suburb which Syrian troops captured, south of Damascus, Syria. Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Syrian President Bashar Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion. (AP Photo/SANA, File)

(AP) — Forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar Assad have firmly seized the momentum in the country’s civil war in recent weeks, capturing one rebel stronghold after another and triumphantly planting the two-starred Syrian government flag amid shattered buildings and rubble-strewn streets.

Despite global outrage over the use of chemical weapons, Assad’s government is successfully exploiting divisions among the opposition, dwindling foreign help for the rebel cause and significant local support, all linked to the same thing: discomfort with the Islamic extremists who have become a major part of the rebellion.

The battlefield gains would strengthen the government’s hand in peace talks sought by the world community.

Both the Syrian government and the opposition have said they are ready to attend a proposed peace conference in Geneva that the U.S. and Russia are trying to convene, although it remains unclear whether the meeting will indeed take place. The Western-backed opposition in exile, which has little support among rebel fighters inside Syria and even less control over them, has set several conditions for its participation, chief among them that Assad must not be part of a transitional government — a notion Damascus has roundly rejected.

“President Bashar Assad will be heading any transitional stage in Syria, like it or not,” Omar Ossi, a member of Syria’s parliament, told The Associated Press.

The government’s recent gains on the outskirts of the capital, Damascus, and in the north outside the country’s largest city, Aleppo, have reinforced Assad’s position. And the more the government advances, the easier it is to dismiss the weak and fractious opposition’s demands.

“Assad wants to go to Geneva with credit, not debit,” said Hisham Jaber, a retired Lebanese army general who heads the Beirut-based Middle East Center for Studies and Political Research. “He is trying day after day to gain on the battlefield, and when he goes to Geneva he can say, … ‘OK, here’s the situation — we are strong on the field. What do you have?’”

The government has made its biggest gains in the suburbs south of Damascus, where army troops backed by guerrillas from the Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah group and Shiite militants from Iraq have captured five towns since Oct. 11. The latest to fall was Hejeira, which army troops swept through Wednesday, just days after capturing the adjacent suburb of Sbeineh.

The troops were quickly followed by state television cameras eager to broadcast the victory: a two-starred government flag triumphantly planted amid bombed-out buildings, twisted rebar and rubble-strewn streets.

In northern Syria, Assad’s forces have captured two towns this month — Safira and Tel Aran, southeast of the battlefield city of Aleppo — and have retaken a military base near Aleppo’s international airport.

Aleppo, the country’s largest city and former commercial capital, is a major prize in the war. Assad’s military and the rebels have been battling over it since the summer of 2012, carving it up into rebel- and government-held areas and leaving much of the city in ruins.

In some ways, the recent run of government victories fit into the regular back-and-forth rhythm of the conflict over the past nearly three years, with the pendulum swinging in Assad’s favor at the moment.

But the government advances around Aleppo hold greater trouble for the opposition since they suggest the rebels’ grip on the north — much of which fell to anti-Assad fighters over the past year — is far more tenuous than once believed.

A confluence of factors has increasingly hampered the opposition’s war effort in the north.

The rebels have been crippled by infighting since the al-Qaida-linked Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant aggressively pushed into rebel-held areas of the north this year. Fighters from the extremist group, most of them foreigners, have clashed repeatedly with more moderate rebel brigades, leaving scores dead on both sides.

Rebel groups, particularly the Islamic State but more mainstream factions as well, also have been engaged in a brutal side conflict with Syria’s Kurdish minority, which has a large presence in the northeast and parts of Aleppo province.

Combined, these two wars-within-a-war have sapped the opposition’s strength and undermined the effort to oust Assad.

They have also provided an opening for the Syrian leader to exploit.

“Fighting among ourselves has done a lot of damage,” Abu Thabet, the commander of the Aleppo Swords Battalion, said by telephone.  “Six months ago, the regime was always on the defensive and we would attack first. Now, after we started infighting, the regime is always on the offensive. They attack, and we defend.” Abu Thabet spoke on condition he be identified only his nom de guerre to protect his security.

Rebels also have been frustrated by U.S. President Barack Obama’s decision to seek a diplomatic path to disarming Damascus of its chemical weapons.

After an Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack on rebel-held suburbs of Damascus that killed hundreds, Washington accused Assad’s forces of carrying them out — though his government denied it. The U.S. then threatened military strikes against Syrian forces. The strikes were averted when Russia brokered a deal to destroy Assad’s chemical arsenal by mid-2014.

Many in the opposition had held out hopes that American military intervention — even if limited in scale — would help tip the scales of a deadlocked civil war in the rebels’ favor. Compounding their disappointment, many rebels saw the diplomatic deal as a giving green light to Assad to continue killing people with conventional weapons, as well as effectively making the Syrian leader a partner with the international community at least until the arsenal is destroyed.

At the same time, the flow of weapons and ammunition from across the border in neighboring Turkey to fighters inside Syria has slowed to a trickle, rebels say, as Ankara has grown increasingly concerned about the prominent role of Islamic extremists.

“Support from the military council of Aleppo and its suburbs has stopped completely,” said Abu Thabet, referring to the rebel body that coordinates the weapons flow from Turkey to rebel battalions doing the fighting.

“This has all stopped,” he said. “I’m on the ground, I really don’t know what’s going on with Turkey or the council, all I know is that we’re not getting anything.”

___

Associated Press writers Albert Aji in Damascus, Syria, and Yasmine Saker in Beirut contributed to this report.

___

Follow Ryan Lucas on Twitter at www.twitter.com/relucasz .

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/cae69a7523db45408eeb2b3a98c0c9c5/Article_2013-11-16-ML-Syria-Tides-Of-War/id-44ef04e8fe324ad295fd75243601324e
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Newly redesigned Facebook Messenger now available for all

Facebook Messenger

The all-new design and features can now be used by everyone

The latest update to Facebook Messenger, which was first announced about two weeks ago, is now rolling out to all users. Previously only available to a limited number (presumably to catch bugs), the new version with an all-new design and features will be available for everyone to download.

Along with a new white and light blue design (that frankly looks iOS 7-inspired) and faster performance, along with new chat features like the ability to message someone with just their phone number, the latest update is worth a look. It now stands in pretty high contrast to the stand-alone Facebook app, which can be kind of jarring, but the Messenger experience is now much improved.

Grab an update to the latest version at the Play Store link above.

Via: Facebook

    



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Police: Indie Musicians Killed By Former Bandmate In NYC

Police say three musicians, two from an Iranian-American indie rock group, were shot and killed early Monday and a fourth person was wounded in the East Williamsburg area of Brooklyn, New York. The alleged assailant, who took his own life, was also a musician, they said.

According to The Associated Press:

“Two of the dead were brothers and members of the group the Yellow Dogs, who came to the U.S. from Iran three years ago after appearing in a film about the underground music scene there, according to band manager Ali Salehezadeh. Another person killed was also a musician but wasn’t in the band, and the wounded person was an artist, he said.

The shootings reportedly took place at an apartment shared by some of the band members.”

The New York Daily News quotes sources as saying the shooter “was found dead on the roof [of the apartment] from a single blast from a .308-caliber rifle, apparently fired from the bottom of his chin.”

It said the gunman, who has not been identified, “was kicked out of the band recently.”

The Daily News said: “On the second floor, Soroush Farazmand, 27, was found lying face up, dead from a gunshot wound to the chest.

Two others, Arash Farazmand and Ali Eskandarian were found dead on the third floor, both from gunblasts to the head.”

And The New York Times says:

“Yellow Dogs … got its start in Tehran, rehearsing in a makeshift soundproof studio and organizing clandestine concerts to avoid punishment by Iranian authorities. …

The assailant, who was not immediately identified, was believed to be another Iranian-American musician, possibly playing with the Yellow Dogs or another group called the Free Keys, said Raymond W. Kelly, the police commissioner. Mr. Kelly added that the motive had something to do with ‘a dispute over money involving an indie rock band.’”

The Times says the band had performed at prominent venues such as Webster Hall and the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Tex.

Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/11/11/244568082/police-indie-musicians-killed-by-former-bandmate-in-nyc?ft=1&f=1001
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Xbox, can you hear me now? One requires repetition

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Like a stubborn family member or insubordinate employee, Xbox One owners might need to tell their fancy new console what to do more than once.

In flashy commercials that began airing last week to promote Microsoft’s upcoming video game system, an array of users verbally command their Xbox Ones to do stuff like answer a Skype call, fire up a “Titanfall” match or play the latest “Star Trek” film. The ads leave out one detail: They probably had to repeat themselves a couple of times for it to work.

At a demonstration of the Xbox One this week organized by Microsoft, the new version of the company’s voice-and-motion-detecting Kinect sensor didn’t work nearly as flawlessly in real life. The Xbox 360 successor, which is scheduled for release Nov. 22, required several commands to be repeated for the response to pop up on screen.

During a private 45-minute presentation showcasing the console’s media and entertainment capabilities, about 10 of 45 voice commands issued had to be repeated by a Microsoft spokesman — some as many as four times. Kinect didn’t immediately detect such orders as “Xbox, watch ESPN” and “Xbox, Bing movies with Sandra Bullock” during the demo.

“Everything you’re seeing here is going to get better,” promised Jose Pinero, senior director of marketing and public relations for Xbox, at the conclusion of Wednesday’s demo. “Right now, we’re still a couple of weeks away but voice, the more you use it and the more the system learns, the more accurate it becomes. We’re still working on fit and finish.”

When the company unveiled the Xbox One at its Redmond, Wash., headquarters last May, Microsoft hyped the machine not as a super-powered gaming console but as an all-in-one entertainment solution for living rooms that would allow users to easily switch between — and snap together — activities on a TV screen, without needing to mash buttons.

The previous Kinect sensor was equally billed as a game changer when it debuted in 2010 but was considered by many gamers to ultimately be a gimmick.

Unlike the last Kinect, Microsoft is including the new sensor with each Xbox One system, which will cost $499. The updated version of the camera has a field of vision that’s 60 percent wider than Kinect for Xbox 360. It can also detect more bodies, as well as heart rates and facial expressions.

Sony Corp. will similarly release an updated PlayStation Camera when its PlayStation 4 debuts a week ahead of the Xbox One, but that sensor is optional for the PS4, which cost $100 less than the Xbox One.

“Microsoft got so intoxicated by the first generation of Kinect that I think they’re just assuming people are still really excited about Kinect,” said James McQuivey, Forrester Research analyst and author of “Digital Disruption: Unleashing the Next Wave of Innovation.”

McQuivey said because Microsoft has turned its attention to other audiences besides just gamers, they could potentially sell half as many Xbox Ones as they did Xbox 360s over the next-gen console’s lifetime, especially if the system doesn’t work as advertised.

While the Xbox One’s voice detection did not function properly during Wednesday’s demo, other Xbox One features operated without fault. Graphically, the slick Xbox One interface was able to almost seamlessly switch between such features as playing “Forza Motorsport 5,” watching a live episode of “Let’s Make a Deal” and viewing a channel guide.

Microsoft calls its listings OneGuide, and users can curate which TV channels and media apps appear — and in what order. The Xbox One can play live TV and provide listings if hooked up to a TV receiver, but it can’t act as a TV recording device, although the Xbox One can record and upload footage captured from games and with the Kinect sensor.

Microsoft announced Friday that streaming content apps like Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Instant Video, VUDU and Crackle would be among the first batch coming to the console before spring 2014. Others bringing apps to Xbox One include the networks ESPN, Univision, Fox, CW and HBO, as well as the NFL.

___

Online:

http://www.xbox.com

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Derrik J. Lang on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/derrikjlang.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/xbox-hear-now-one-requires-repetition-135423157.html
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McAuliffe elected governor of Va. over Cuccinelli

Vice President Joe Biden, center, accompanied by Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., left, speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, right, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Joe Biden, center, accompanied by Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., left, speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, right, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Republican gubernatorial candidate, Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, left, smiles along with his wife, Teiro, as she holds a puppy during a rally at Republican headquarters in Richmond, Va., Monday, Nov. 4, 2013. Cuccinelli faces Democrat Terry McAuliffe in Tuesday’s election. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, left, joined by, from second from left, Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., Rep. Gerald Connolly, D-Va., and Vice President Joe Biden, speaks at a campaign event in Annandale, Va. on Monday, Nov. 4, 2013. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Joe Biden, right, is greeted by Rep. Gerald Connolly, D-Va., before speaking as at rally for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, left, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, right, Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, in Annandale, Va. On Tuesday, Virginia voters go to the polls to choose between McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli for the next governor. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

(AP) — Terry McAuliffe wrested the governor’s office from Republicans on Tuesday, capping an acrimonious campaign that was driven by a crush of negative advertising, non-stop accusations of dodgy dealings and a tea party-backed nominee who tested the limits of swing-voting Virginia.

McAuliffe received 47 percent to Cuccinelli’s 46 percent, with 97 precincts reporting.

McAuliffe, a Democrat, ran strong among unmarried women, voters who made abortion a top issue and those who called the suburbs of Washington, D.C., home, according to preliminary results of an exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks. Cuccinelli, meanwhile, fared well among tea party backers, gun owners and among the state’s rural residents — but there were not enough of them to yield a victory.

In winning, McAuliffe broke a stubborn streak in state history. During the past nine governor’s races, the party that controlled the White House at the time has always lost.

That’s not to say voters rushed to back McAuliffe’s vision for Virginia. Turnout for was low, and both candidates worked through Election Day to reach as many potential voters as possible.

Only 52 percent of voters said they strongly backed their candidate, the rest had reservations or backed a candidate because they disliked the other options, according to exit polls. Neither major candidate’s ideological views seemed “right” for a majority of Virginians, 50 percent called Cuccinelli too conservative, 41 percent said McAuliffe is too liberal.

The exit poll included interviews with 2,376 voters from 40 polling places around the state. The margin of error was plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Voters’ dissatisfaction couldn’t overshadow the fight on television. McAuliffe enjoyed a 10-to-1 advertising advantage over Cuccinelli during the final days.

“We were very heavily outspent but I’m proud we ran on first principles,” Cuccinelli told supporters in conceding. “The battle goes on.”

The campaign’s tilt turned many voters off.

“I really hated the negative campaigning,” said Ellen Tolton, a 52-year-old grant writer. “I didn’t want to vote for any of them.”

Richard Powell, a 60-year-old retired IT manager who lives in Norfolk, described himself as an independent who frequently votes for members of both parties. He said he cast his ballot for McAuliffe, although not because he’s particularly enthusiastic about him. He said he was more determined not to vote for Cuccinelli, who he said overreaches on a variety of medical issues.

Voters were barraged with a series of commercials that tied Cuccinelli to restricting abortions, and while Powell said the negative advertising “got to be sickening,” abortion rights played a factor in his vote.

“I’m not in favor of abortion — let’s put it that way — but I find that restricting abortion causes far more social harm than allowing abortion, so that was an issue for me,” he said.

McAuliffe’s narrow victory in Virginia rested on a 9-point edge among women, while the two major party candidates split men about evenly, according to exit polls. McAuliffe carried liberals and moderates, Cuccinelli independents and tea party backers.

Libertarian Robert Sarvis spiked to 15 percent support among voters younger than 30, and independents.

From the outset, the campaign shaped up as a barometer of voters’ moods and a test of whether a swing-voting state like Virginia would elect a tea party-style governor. Republicans bet a deeply conservative candidate would be their best shot at holding onto the governor’s office, passing over a lieutenant governor for Cuccinelli, a crusader against the federal health care law.

McAuliffe, who once led the Democratic National Committee and is a confidant of former President Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, said he would expand Medicaid to provide health coverage for 400,000 people under the federal health care law. By contrast, Cuccinelli, the current attorney general, vehemently opposed the law and was the first to challenge it in court.

Cuccinelli pinned his hopes on voters’ frustrations with the federal health care law he attempted to foil. He tried to make the election into a referendum on the health care law, which McAuliffe supports. The 45-year-old Cuccinelli went into Election Day trying to overcome a deficit in the polls, a crush of negative ads and a lingering wariness among fellow Republicans about his conservative views.

Some Republicans switched allegiances for the election and others sided with Sarvis.

Sharon Ann Ross, a 56-year-old landscape designer, said her vote for McAuliffe in Manassas was in keeping with a gradual shift in her politics. She used to favor Republicans, but now she supports Democrats.

“I’m kind of embarrassed to be a Republican,” said Ross, a gun owner who favors conservatives on Second Amendment issues but said the economy drove her decision.

“Right now, I feel more comfortable voting through my wallet,” she said. “I’d like to better my life, and I think a Democratic ticket does more for average people like me.”

As one of just two races for governor nationwide, political strategists eyed the race for clues about what would work — and what would not — for 2014′s midterm elections when control of Congress is up for grabs.

The 56-year-old McAuliffe succeeds term-limited Gov. Bob McDonnell, a Republican, for a four-year term starting in January.

___

Associated Press Writer Brock Vergakis contributed to this report from Norfolk and Virginia Beach, Va. Associated Press writers Ben Nukols in Manassas and Steve Szkotak in Richmond also contributed.

___

Follow Philip Elliott on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philip_elliott

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-11-05-VA%20Governor/id-72f476cb39cc43d4b4d97dcb7919791d
Category: Preachers of LA   reggie bush   al jazeera  

Scientists capture most detailed picture yet of key AIDS protein

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Contact: Sarah Smith
sas2072@med.cornell.edu
646-317-7401
Weill Cornell Medical College

Finding represents a scientific feat and progress towards an HIV vaccine

NEW YORK (October 31, 2013) — Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Weill Cornell Medical College have determined the first atomic-level structure of the tripartite HIV envelope protein — long considered one of the most difficult targets in structural biology and of great value for medical science.

The new data provide the most detailed picture yet of the AIDS-causing virus’s complex envelope, including sites that future vaccines will try to mimic to elicit a protective immune response.

“Most of the prior structural studies of this envelope complex focused on individual subunits, but we’ve needed the structure of the full complex to properly define the sites of vulnerability that could be targeted, for example with a vaccine,” said Dr. Ian A. Wilson, the Hansen Professor of Structural Biology at TSRI and a senior author of the new research with biologists Drs. Andrew Ward and Bridget Carragher of TSRI and virologist and immunologist Dr. John Moore of Weill Cornell.

The findings were published in two papers in Science Express, the early online edition of the journal Science, on October 31, 2013.


A Difficult Target

HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, infects about 34 million people globally, 10 percent of whom are children, according to World Health Organization estimates. Although antiviral drugs are now used to manage many HIV infections, especially in developed countries, scientists have long sought a vaccine that can prevent new infections and would help perhaps to ultimately eradicate the virus from the human population.

However, none of the HIV vaccines tested so far has come close to providing adequate protection. This failure is due largely to the challenges posed by HIV’s envelope protein, known to virologists as Env.

HIV’s Env is not a single, simple protein but rather a “trimer” made of three identical, loosely connected structures with a stalk-like subunit, gp41, and a cap-like region, gp120. Each trimer resembles a mushroom and about 15 of these Env trimers sprout from the membrane of a typical virus particle, ready to latch onto susceptible human cells and facilitate viral entry.

Although Env in principle is exposed to the immune system, in practice it has evolved highly effective strategies for evading immune attack. It frequently mutates its outermost “variable loop” regions, for example, and also coats its surfaces with hard-to-grip sugar molecules called glycans.

Even so, HIV vaccine designers might have succeeded by now had they been able to study the structure of the entire Env protein at atomic-scale–in particular, to fully characterize the sites where the most effective virus-neutralizing antibodies bind. But Env’s structure is so complex and delicate that scientists have had great difficulty obtaining the protein in a form that is suitable for atomic-resolution imaging.

“It tends to fall apart, for example, even when it’s on the surface of the virus, so to study it we have to engineer it to be more stable,” said Dr. Ward, who is an assistant professor in TSRI’s Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology.
The key goal in this area has been to engineer a version of the Env trimer that has the stability and other properties needed for atomic-resolution imaging, yet retains virtually all of the complex structural characteristics of native Env.


Imaging Env

After many years in pursuit of this goal, Drs. Moore, Rogier W. Sanders and their colleagues at Weill Cornell, working with Drs. Wilson, Ward and others at TSRI, recently managed to produce a version of the Env trimer (called BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140) that is suitable for atomic-level imaging work–and includes all of the trimer structure that normally sits outside the viral membrane. The TSRI researchers then evaluated the new Env trimer using advanced versions of two imaging methods, X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. The X-ray crystallography study was the first ever of an Env trimer, and both methods resolved the trimer structure to a finer level of detail than has been reported before.

“The new data are consistent with the findings on Env subunits over the last 15 years, but also have enabled us to explain many prior observations about HIV in structural terms for the first time,” said Dr. Jean-Philippe Julien, a senior research associate in the Wilson laboratory at TSRI, who was first author of the X-ray crystallography study.

The data illuminated the complex process by which the Env trimer assembles and later undergoes radical shape changes during infection and clarified how it compares to envelope proteins on other dangerous viruses, such as flu and Ebola.

Arguably the most important implications of the new findings are for HIV vaccine design. In both of the new studies, Env trimers were imaged while bound to broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV. Such antibodies, isolated from naturally infected patients, are the very rare ones that somehow bind to Env in a way that blocks the infectivity of a high proportion of HIV strains.

Ideally an HIV vaccine would elicit large numbers of such antibodies from patients, and to achieve that, vaccine designers would like to know the precise structural details of the sites where these antibodies bind to the virus–so that they can mimic those viral “epitopes” with the vaccine.

“It’s been a privilege for us to work with the Scripps’ team on this project,” said Dr. Moore, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Weill Cornell. “Now we all need to harness this new knowledge to design and test next-generation trimers and see if we can induce the broadly active neutralizing antibodies that an effective vaccine is going to need.”

“One surprise from this study was the revelation of the complexity and the relative inaccessibility of these neutralizing epitopes,” Dr. Julien added. “It helps to know this for future vaccine design, but it also makes it clear why previous structure-based HIV vaccines have had so little success.”

“We found that these neutralizing epitopes encompass features such as the variable loop regions and glycans that were excluded from previous studies of individual Env subunits,” said Dmitry Lyumkis, first author of the electron microscopy study, who is a graduate student at TSRI participating in the NIH-funded National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy. “We observed, too, that neutralizing antibody binding to gp120 can be influenced by the neighboring gp120 structure within the trimer–another complication that was not apparent when we were not studying the whole trimer.”

Having provided these valuable structural insights, the new Env trimer is now being put to work in vaccine development. “We and others are already injecting the trimer into animals to elicit antibodies,” Dr. Ward said. “We can look at the antibodies that are generated and if necessary modify the Env trimer structure and try again. In this iterative way, we aim to refine and increase the antibody response in the animals and eventually, humans.”

###

Other contributors to the studies, “Cryo-EM structure of a fully glycosylated soluble cleaved HIV-1 Env trimer,” and “Crystal structure of a soluble cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer in complex with a glycan-dependent broadly neutralizing antibody,” included TSRI’s Natalia de Val, Devin Sok, Drs. Robyn L. Stanfield and Marc C. Deller; and Weill Cornell Medical College’s Albert Cupo and Dr. Per-Johan Klasse. In addition to Drs. Wilson, Ward and Carragher, senior participants at TSRI included Drs. Clinton S. Potter and Dennis Burton.

The research was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (HIVRAD P01 AI82362, R01 AI36082, R01 AI084817, R37 AI36082, R01 AI33292), the NIH’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences (GM103310) and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Consortium. IAVI has filed a patent that includes WCMC and TSRI authors on the development of the BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers as vaccine antigens.


Weill Cornell Medical College


Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University’s medical school located in New York City, is committed to excellence in research, teaching, patient care and the advancement of the art and science of medicine, locally, nationally and globally. Physicians and scientists of Weill Cornell Medical College are engaged in cutting-edge research from bench to bedside, aimed at unlocking mysteries of the human body in health and sickness and toward developing new treatments and prevention strategies. In its commitment to global health and education, Weill Cornell has a strong presence in places such as Qatar, Tanzania, Haiti, Brazil, Austria and Turkey. Through the historic Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, the Medical College is the first in the U.S. to offer its M.D. degree overseas. Weill Cornell is the birthplace of many medical advances — including the development of the Pap test for cervical cancer, the synthesis of penicillin, the first successful embryo-biopsy pregnancy and birth in the U.S., the first clinical trial of gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease, and most recently, the world’s first successful use of deep brain stimulation to treat a minimally conscious brain-injured patient. Weill Cornell Medical College is affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, where its faculty provides comprehensive patient care at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. The Medical College is also affiliated with Houston Methodist. For more information, visit weill.cornell.edu.


Office of External Affairs

Weill Cornell Medical College

tel: 646.317.7401

email: pr@med.cornell.edu

Follow WCMC on Twitter and Facebook



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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

31-Oct-2013

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Contact: Sarah Smith
sas2072@med.cornell.edu
646-317-7401
Weill Cornell Medical College

Finding represents a scientific feat and progress towards an HIV vaccine

NEW YORK (October 31, 2013) — Collaborating scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Weill Cornell Medical College have determined the first atomic-level structure of the tripartite HIV envelope protein — long considered one of the most difficult targets in structural biology and of great value for medical science.

The new data provide the most detailed picture yet of the AIDS-causing virus’s complex envelope, including sites that future vaccines will try to mimic to elicit a protective immune response.

“Most of the prior structural studies of this envelope complex focused on individual subunits, but we’ve needed the structure of the full complex to properly define the sites of vulnerability that could be targeted, for example with a vaccine,” said Dr. Ian A. Wilson, the Hansen Professor of Structural Biology at TSRI and a senior author of the new research with biologists Drs. Andrew Ward and Bridget Carragher of TSRI and virologist and immunologist Dr. John Moore of Weill Cornell.

The findings were published in two papers in Science Express, the early online edition of the journal Science, on October 31, 2013.


A Difficult Target

HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, infects about 34 million people globally, 10 percent of whom are children, according to World Health Organization estimates. Although antiviral drugs are now used to manage many HIV infections, especially in developed countries, scientists have long sought a vaccine that can prevent new infections and would help perhaps to ultimately eradicate the virus from the human population.

However, none of the HIV vaccines tested so far has come close to providing adequate protection. This failure is due largely to the challenges posed by HIV’s envelope protein, known to virologists as Env.

HIV’s Env is not a single, simple protein but rather a “trimer” made of three identical, loosely connected structures with a stalk-like subunit, gp41, and a cap-like region, gp120. Each trimer resembles a mushroom and about 15 of these Env trimers sprout from the membrane of a typical virus particle, ready to latch onto susceptible human cells and facilitate viral entry.

Although Env in principle is exposed to the immune system, in practice it has evolved highly effective strategies for evading immune attack. It frequently mutates its outermost “variable loop” regions, for example, and also coats its surfaces with hard-to-grip sugar molecules called glycans.

Even so, HIV vaccine designers might have succeeded by now had they been able to study the structure of the entire Env protein at atomic-scale–in particular, to fully characterize the sites where the most effective virus-neutralizing antibodies bind. But Env’s structure is so complex and delicate that scientists have had great difficulty obtaining the protein in a form that is suitable for atomic-resolution imaging.

“It tends to fall apart, for example, even when it’s on the surface of the virus, so to study it we have to engineer it to be more stable,” said Dr. Ward, who is an assistant professor in TSRI’s Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology.
The key goal in this area has been to engineer a version of the Env trimer that has the stability and other properties needed for atomic-resolution imaging, yet retains virtually all of the complex structural characteristics of native Env.


Imaging Env

After many years in pursuit of this goal, Drs. Moore, Rogier W. Sanders and their colleagues at Weill Cornell, working with Drs. Wilson, Ward and others at TSRI, recently managed to produce a version of the Env trimer (called BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140) that is suitable for atomic-level imaging work–and includes all of the trimer structure that normally sits outside the viral membrane. The TSRI researchers then evaluated the new Env trimer using advanced versions of two imaging methods, X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. The X-ray crystallography study was the first ever of an Env trimer, and both methods resolved the trimer structure to a finer level of detail than has been reported before.

“The new data are consistent with the findings on Env subunits over the last 15 years, but also have enabled us to explain many prior observations about HIV in structural terms for the first time,” said Dr. Jean-Philippe Julien, a senior research associate in the Wilson laboratory at TSRI, who was first author of the X-ray crystallography study.

The data illuminated the complex process by which the Env trimer assembles and later undergoes radical shape changes during infection and clarified how it compares to envelope proteins on other dangerous viruses, such as flu and Ebola.

Arguably the most important implications of the new findings are for HIV vaccine design. In both of the new studies, Env trimers were imaged while bound to broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV. Such antibodies, isolated from naturally infected patients, are the very rare ones that somehow bind to Env in a way that blocks the infectivity of a high proportion of HIV strains.

Ideally an HIV vaccine would elicit large numbers of such antibodies from patients, and to achieve that, vaccine designers would like to know the precise structural details of the sites where these antibodies bind to the virus–so that they can mimic those viral “epitopes” with the vaccine.

“It’s been a privilege for us to work with the Scripps’ team on this project,” said Dr. Moore, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Weill Cornell. “Now we all need to harness this new knowledge to design and test next-generation trimers and see if we can induce the broadly active neutralizing antibodies that an effective vaccine is going to need.”

“One surprise from this study was the revelation of the complexity and the relative inaccessibility of these neutralizing epitopes,” Dr. Julien added. “It helps to know this for future vaccine design, but it also makes it clear why previous structure-based HIV vaccines have had so little success.”

“We found that these neutralizing epitopes encompass features such as the variable loop regions and glycans that were excluded from previous studies of individual Env subunits,” said Dmitry Lyumkis, first author of the electron microscopy study, who is a graduate student at TSRI participating in the NIH-funded National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy. “We observed, too, that neutralizing antibody binding to gp120 can be influenced by the neighboring gp120 structure within the trimer–another complication that was not apparent when we were not studying the whole trimer.”

Having provided these valuable structural insights, the new Env trimer is now being put to work in vaccine development. “We and others are already injecting the trimer into animals to elicit antibodies,” Dr. Ward said. “We can look at the antibodies that are generated and if necessary modify the Env trimer structure and try again. In this iterative way, we aim to refine and increase the antibody response in the animals and eventually, humans.”

###

Other contributors to the studies, “Cryo-EM structure of a fully glycosylated soluble cleaved HIV-1 Env trimer,” and “Crystal structure of a soluble cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer in complex with a glycan-dependent broadly neutralizing antibody,” included TSRI’s Natalia de Val, Devin Sok, Drs. Robyn L. Stanfield and Marc C. Deller; and Weill Cornell Medical College’s Albert Cupo and Dr. Per-Johan Klasse. In addition to Drs. Wilson, Ward and Carragher, senior participants at TSRI included Drs. Clinton S. Potter and Dennis Burton.

The research was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (HIVRAD P01 AI82362, R01 AI36082, R01 AI084817, R37 AI36082, R01 AI33292), the NIH’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences (GM103310) and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Consortium. IAVI has filed a patent that includes WCMC and TSRI authors on the development of the BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers as vaccine antigens.


Weill Cornell Medical College


Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University’s medical school located in New York City, is committed to excellence in research, teaching, patient care and the advancement of the art and science of medicine, locally, nationally and globally. Physicians and scientists of Weill Cornell Medical College are engaged in cutting-edge research from bench to bedside, aimed at unlocking mysteries of the human body in health and sickness and toward developing new treatments and prevention strategies. In its commitment to global health and education, Weill Cornell has a strong presence in places such as Qatar, Tanzania, Haiti, Brazil, Austria and Turkey. Through the historic Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, the Medical College is the first in the U.S. to offer its M.D. degree overseas. Weill Cornell is the birthplace of many medical advances — including the development of the Pap test for cervical cancer, the synthesis of penicillin, the first successful embryo-biopsy pregnancy and birth in the U.S., the first clinical trial of gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease, and most recently, the world’s first successful use of deep brain stimulation to treat a minimally conscious brain-injured patient. Weill Cornell Medical College is affiliated with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, where its faculty provides comprehensive patient care at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. The Medical College is also affiliated with Houston Methodist. For more information, visit weill.cornell.edu.


Office of External Affairs

Weill Cornell Medical College

tel: 646.317.7401

email: pr@med.cornell.edu

Follow WCMC on Twitter and Facebook



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/wcmc-scm103113.php
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